June 9, 2012
Fashion is about to descend on Rio — not to shop, but to talk sustainability during the UN conference on Sustainable Development this month.
 There is a growing fashion underground attempting to use what is generally regarded as the most self-centered and value-bereft of industries to actually affect the economic and thus political and personal situation of some of the most challenged global communities.
 In fashion three examples of anything is a trend (one is a fluke; two a coincidence), and that of all the “ethical” initiatives that get lip service in fashion, be it organic cotton or reducing waste or recycled shopping bags, this one, the one that defines “sustainability” as creating business that can exist on their own and thus give a future to a community, the one about empowering individuals to make their own choices going forward, may, in fact, be the one that actually succeeds in sparking systemic change.
Read more: http://blogs.ft.com/material-world/2012/06/08/fashion-goes-to-rio-20/#axzz1xM1gt0Lv

Fashion is about to descend on Rio — not to shop, but to talk sustainability during the UN conference on Sustainable Development this month.

There is a growing fashion underground attempting to use what is generally regarded as the most self-centered and value-bereft of industries to actually affect the economic and thus political and personal situation of some of the most challenged global communities.

In fashion three examples of anything is a trend (one is a fluke; two a coincidence), and that of all the “ethical” initiatives that get lip service in fashion, be it organic cotton or reducing waste or recycled shopping bags, this one, the one that defines “sustainability” as creating business that can exist on their own and thus give a future to a community, the one about empowering individuals to make their own choices going forward, may, in fact, be the one that actually succeeds in sparking systemic change.

Read more: http://blogs.ft.com/material-world/2012/06/08/fashion-goes-to-rio-20/#axzz1xM1gt0Lv

June 3, 2012
The Observer Ethical Awards ceremony took place last night recognising the achievements of those making sustainable change from the fields of business and sport to grass roots projects and fashion. 
Scooping the fashion and accesories award this year was accessories label Veja. Using organic cotton from ecology initiatives in North Brazil, wild Amazonian rubber and acacia tanned leather, Veja produces trainers and accessories which manage to combine strong ethical principles with creating something beautiful. 
Read more: http://www.vogue.co.uk/blogs/the-green-style-blog/2012/05/observer-ethical-awards
More on Veja products: http://blog.veja.fr/en

The Observer Ethical Awards ceremony took place last night recognising the achievements of those making sustainable change from the fields of business and sport to grass roots projects and fashion.

Scooping the fashion and accesories award this year was accessories label Veja. Using organic cotton from ecology initiatives in North Brazil, wild Amazonian rubber and acacia tanned leather, Veja produces trainers and accessories which manage to combine strong ethical principles with creating something beautiful. 

Read more: http://www.vogue.co.uk/blogs/the-green-style-blog/2012/05/observer-ethical-awards

More on Veja products: http://blog.veja.fr/en

May 13, 2012
Missoni has teamed up with the ethical fashion company Muzungu Sisters and shoe company C.B. Made in Italy for a new collaboration: a loafer made using upcycled Missoni fabric. Missoni has donated three fabrics for the project that would otherwise have been unused and destroyed. 
The Muzungu Sisters was founded in 2009 with the aim to provide locally sourced and handcrafted products from around the globe. 10% of the sales from the shoes will benefit the Small Steps Project, a UK-based charity dedicated to improving the lives of children living on municipal landfills across the globe.
Read more: http://www.vogue.co.uk/blogs/the-green-style-blog/2012/05/missoni-and-muzungu-sisters

Missoni has teamed up with the ethical fashion company Muzungu Sisters and shoe company C.B. Made in Italy for a new collaboration: a loafer made using upcycled Missoni fabric. Missoni has donated three fabrics for the project that would otherwise have been unused and destroyed. 

The Muzungu Sisters was founded in 2009 with the aim to provide locally sourced and handcrafted products from around the globe. 10% of the sales from the shoes will benefit the Small Steps Project, a UK-based charity dedicated to improving the lives of children living on municipal landfills across the globe.

Read more: http://www.vogue.co.uk/blogs/the-green-style-blog/2012/05/missoni-and-muzungu-sisters

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